Newspaper: Le Quotidien – Un ascenseur horizontal à Esch

Source: Le Quotidien
Date: 15 September 2021



Newspaper: Le Quotidien – Esch : une navette autonome rue de l’Alzette

Source: Le Quotidien
Date: 10 September 2021



Announcement: H2020 AVENUE deployment at Esch-sur-Alzette

The AVENUE Project is proud to announce the deployment of Automated Shuttles for public transport services at the new AVENUE replicator site of Esch-sur-Alzette operated by Sales-Lentz.

More info to be found at Esch-sur-Alzette webpage

Video: Deployment of FARECO’s V2I communication at Parc OL line N1 operated by Keolis

In the framework of H2020 AVENUE and other mobility projects in Lyon, a permanent installation of V2I communication was conducted by FERACO and was fully integrated into the urban transport network of Greater Lyon. This installation will be managed by the operator Kéolis, partner in this installation, and is the first of its kind in France.

A subsidiary of the FAYAT group, the leading independent French construction group, FARECO is one of the key players in new mobility with products at the cutting edge of innovation.

In this video, including more than half of the shots made with a drone and largely enriched with motion design, FARECO presents the NEXO Roadside Unit, which provides V2I communication to enhance the last-mile service on the Lyon Décines site.

NEXO presides over the movements of an autonomous shuttle, on open lanes where several thousand vehicles circulate daily.

Annoucement: Two New AVENUE Replicator Sites

The AVENUE project is proud to welcome the two new AVENUE replicator sites at Uvrier-Sion and Esch-sur-Alzette, where the involved partners are launching regular on-demand poblic transport service with fully automated NAVYA mini-buses. The Uvrier-Sion replicator site will be run by PostAuto, HES-SO Valais and the City of Sion and the Esch-sur-Alzette replicator site will be run by the city of Esch-sur-Alzette and Sales-Lenz

Magazine: Mobilités Magazine – Changement d’échelle pour les navettes autonomes

Source: Mobilités Magazine n°46
Date: March 2021

What are public policy advances in EU for the faster launch of Automated Vehicles services in Public transport?
The AVENUE Project Scientific Coordinator Prof. D. Attias indicates the project’s advances & their potential for the future of services with autonomous shuttles

Want to learn about the public policy advances in Europe for the faster introduction of autonomous vehicle services in Public Transportation? In the Mobilités Magazine n°46, proposals of the removal of the safety-driver in tests with these vehicles from 2021 and the increase in operational speed to a maximum of 60km/h on certain roads are presented. The scientific coordinator of the AVENUE Project, Prof. Danielle ATTIAS, indicates the project’s proposals & advances along with their potential for the future of services with autonomous shuttles as a complement to public transportation. The new business models that can emerge through this market innovation are also being discussed.



TV/Newspaper: SWI Swissinfo – The slow but steady progress of driverless buses in Switzerland

Source: SWI Swissinfo
Author: Simon Bradley
Date: September 24, 2020

Over the past five years, various kinds of autonomous vehicles, including buses, have popped up on Swiss roads. But though testing continues, a driverless future might yet be some years away.

This article is also available in other languages :
deutch (de)
Shuttle-Bus ohne Fahrer ist noch Zukunftsmusik
Português (pt) Ônibus sem motorista na Suíça avança, mas com muitas paradas
中文 (zh) 瑞士无人驾驶公交车虽进展缓慢,却仍在稳步推进
عربي (ar) الحافلات ذاتية القيادة في سويسرا تتقدّم ببطء ولكن بثبات
Français (fr) Les bus autonomes font leur chemin en Suisse
Pусский (ru) Беспилотный транспорт Швейцарии развивается медленно, но верно
Italiano (it) Gli autobus autonomi si fanno strada pian piano in Svizzera

On a crisp autumn morning in the Geneva countryside, a bright orange-and-white electric bus is winding through the leafy 36-hectare grounds of the Belle-Idée hospital site.

The bus is trundling along a gravel path when suddenly a patient and a nurse step out from behind a tree. The vehicle brakes sharply, a bell rings out, a “keep your distance” sign flashes at the front and rear. The couple steps back, and the bus continues slowly on its way.

The toy-like shuttle – empty apart from a safety operator and guided by sensors, GPS and radar – is the centrepiece of a unique driverless public transport experiment.

“It’s a world first for a public transport service,” says Dimitri Konstantas, director of the Information Science Institute at the University of Geneva, who is coordinating the project. “Most sites and lines have a fixed route… but here the difference is that there is no route. You can go anywhere.”

Testing, testing

This summer, a small team began testing the ten-seater vehicles, mapping out the huge Belle-Idée park and its obstacles. In parallel, a Geneva-based start-up, MobileThinking, has been putting the finishing touches to an app that will be tried out by the first passengers before the end of the year.

Then when the project is up and running in the next couple of years, patients, visitors and staff will be able to get around the sprawling complex by using their smartphone to order one of three buses offering an on-demand door-to-door service. External Content

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Users will be able to locate a bus via the app, then send a pick-up request. Software from the Lausanne firm Bestmile will indicate when a bus is available and what the journey time will be. A fleet management system will then adapt the vehicle’s route according to other passenger requests.

The idea is to have a completely automated system with a safety operator back at a central depot monitoring the vehicles, says Jeroen Beukers, an autonomous vehicle expert who is running the project for the Geneva public transport authorities (TPG).

“Next week we are installing electric doors on the bus depot. In the future, you’ll make a booking on your phone, the depot doors will open automatically, a charged bus will pick you up from A and take you to B and then either return to the depot or continue onwards to pick up someone else,” he says.

Driverless bus in Geneva
One of the ten-seater driverless buses drives through the 36-hectare hospital site, east of Geneva city centre. swissinfo.ch

European project

The project is not Geneva’s first driverless bus trial: TPG has been successfully running an automated shuttle on a fixed circular route in Meyrin since 2018.

The Belle-Idée project was selected as part of a four-year European driverless vehicle initiative known as AVENUE (Autonomous Vehicles to Evolve to a New Urban Experience). The European consortium, funded by the European Union’s Horizon 2020 programme, includes pilot schemes in Lyon (France), Luxembourg and Copenhagen (Denmark).

Driverless vehicles in Switzerland

Over the past five years a growing number of other Swiss cities and transport companies have experimented with driverless vehicles on fixed routes (see infobox). This includes Sion, the capital of canton Valais, which in 2016 became the first Swiss city to launch an autonomous bus service in collaboration with Swiss Post.

Apart from the odd minor accident, the results of these trials have been generally positive, with thousands of passengers now regularly taking driverless shuttles.

Swiss ‘pioneer’

The trials have allowed Switzerland “to position itself as a pioneer” in this field, according to Marina Kaempf, spokesperson for the Federal Roads Office.

In most cases the tests were well accepted by the public, with municipalities and cantons developing “realistic” projects to show what the vehicles can do, she tells swissinfo.ch.

But current technologies still don’t allow vehicles that are 100% driverless – i.e. without a safety operator – to be used commercially, the Roads Office says. The exchange of data between driverless vehicles and the outside environment also needs to be improved.

“Longer term, you can imagine driverless buses running more permanently on certain lines when their technologies have been perfected,” says Kaempf. But in the short-term, while autonomous pilot schemes will continue in their current form, the Roads Office is not planning to increase them or turn them into commercial ventures.

Meanwhile, in parallel to these trials, the government is gearing up for the wider use of driverless vehicles on Swiss roads in the coming years. In August, it launched a consultation process to revise the Federal Law on Road Traffic. Part of the proposal aims to improve the legal basis for automated driving and future testing, and to ensure Switzerland can adapt to any international developments in this field.

Huge challenges ahead

Despite Switzerland pushing ahead, not all mobility experts are convinced by driverless buses.

“Maybe they’ll have made big progress in 20 years, but at the moment autonomous buses are a bit of a gadget,” says Vincent Kaufmann, a professor at the Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne (EPFL) and scientific director of the Mobile Lives Forum in Paris.

“What’s interesting is not so much driverless buses, but shared autonomous vehicles, like taxis. We’ll continue to need trams, trains and buses, where you carry 100-200 passengers. But if the shared autonomous vehicle can replace the individual car in the city that’ll be a real gain.”

Driverless challenges – both regulatory and technical – remain huge, raising many questions. Will the introduction of autonomous buses, taxis and privately-owned driverless vehicles just clog up the roads if they are not correctly regulated? How safe will such vehicles be? Will autonomous buses be used downtown or just in suburban areas? How will private data used by autonomous vehicles and passengers be protected? What legal responsibility will public transport firms and drivers have for their autonomous vehicles?

At the technical level, Konstantas feels driverless vehicles still have a long way to go before they can correctly identify objects and anticipate people’s behaviour in the streets.

“Tesla is working on it, but I doubt they’ll be able to do that within 15-20 years,” he says.

He also sees data protection as a big issue. “We’re not allowed to use the data of people walking around in order to learn from it,” he says. “Our system is programmed. It’s not dynamic learning or AI – we don’t have that yet.”

“What we’re doing here is experimental. Is it possible to build the future? We don’t know. Is this going to be useful or not? We don’t know. But we’re going to try.”

On a crisp autumn morning in the Geneva countryside, a bright orange-and-white electric bus is winding through the leafy 36-hectare grounds of the Belle-Idée hospital site.

The bus is trundling along a gravel path when suddenly a patient and a nurse step out from behind a tree. The vehicle brakes sharply, a bell rings out, a “keep your distance” sign flashes at the front and rear. The couple steps back, and the bus continues slowly on its way.

The toy-like shuttle – empty apart from a safety operator and guided by sensors, GPS and radar – is the centrepiece of a unique driverless public transport experiment.

“It’s a world first for a public transport service,” says Dimitri Konstantas, director of the Information Science Institute at the University of Geneva, who is coordinating the project. “Most sites and lines have a fixed route… but here the difference is that there is no route. You can go anywhere.”

Newspaper: La Gazette – Les navettes autonomes sur la bonne voie

Source: La Gazette.fr

Mobilité

Des tests de navettes autonomes sans opérateur embarqué vont avoir lieu à Lyon (Rhône). Une première.

Ces navettes seront par ailleurs accessibles aux personnes à mobilité réduite. Pionnière en 2016 en lançant une navette autonome dans le quartier de La Confluence sur une voie piétonne, Lyon s’accroche à cette longueur d’avance. «Ces navettes répondent clairement au besoin de la desserte du dernier kilomètre. Elles s’inscrivent aussi dans les efforts que nous menons sur l’enjeu environnemental et de santé publique, qui se traduisent déjà par un réseau aux trois quarts électrique», décrit Fouziya Bouzerda, présidente du syndicat mixte des transports du Rhône et de l’agglomération lyonnaise, le Sytral, et vice-présidente de la métropole de Lyon.

Le graal

Décidé à installer les navettes autonomes dans le réseau des transports en commun de Lyon, le Sytral va franchir un nouveau cap. Après deux années d’expérimentation sans incident à La Confluence, le ministère de la Transition écologique et solidaire a autorisé, au printemps, la circulation de la navette sans opérateur embarqué. «Le site a montré sa fiabilité. Nous allons donc tes- ter cette navette avec des opérateurs déportés», indique Pascal Jacquesson, directeur général de Keolis Lyon, délégataire du Sytral. Le graal, ce fameux niveau 5 tout automatique, serait donc à portée de roue? Le Sytral reste prudent, mais, en attendant de pouvoir vérifier si la navette tient la route sans opérateur à bord, il s’organise pour être prêt à implémenter ce mode de transport sur son réseau. L’idée étant d’utiliser les navettes autonomes afin de desservir des sites sur lesquels transitent peu d’usagers, en centre-ville comme en périphérie.La stratégie implique la multiplication et la complexification des essais sur des sites présentant des configurations différentes. Depuis février, le transporteur Berthelet expérimente ce service sur la desserte d’une zone d’activité dans l’est de Lyon. A partir du 15 novembre, deux navettes, exploitées par le Sytral, devaient se relayer entre un arrêt de tramway et le Groupama Stadium. «Un trajet complexe de 1,3 kilomètre, précise Pascal Jacquesson. Les navettes circulent à 18 kilomètres / heure dans le flot de circulation en franchissant notamment un carrefour difficile et des feux tricolores.»

Coûts en baisse

Ces navettes seront par ailleurs accessibles aux personnes à mobilité réduite, les obligeant à une précision au centimètre dans leurs arrêts. Enfin, très vite, elles adopteront une desserte à la demande. Ce test s’inscrit dans le cadre d’un projet européen visant à préparer l’arrivée de la navette autonome en ville et qui associe aussi Copenhague, Genève et Luxembourg. A La Confluence, le challenge est encore plus délicat, notamment parce qu’avant de se lancer, il faut parfaire certaines fonctionnalités comme le départ automatique de la navette. Il est pourtant bien plus décisif. En effet, sans opérateur, le modèle économique devient favorable pour l’exploitation de ces véhicules, a fortiori dans des zones où la fréquentation est faible. «Aujourd’hui, deux tiers des coûts d’exploitation sont liés à la présence d’un chauffeur», pointe Pascal Jacques- son. L’investissement devrait lui aussi diminuer si ces véhicules se généralisent. La boucle vertueuse sera alors enclenchée.

Chiffres clés

Budget : 487 000 € pour l’achat des navettes qui circuleront au stade, financés dans le cadre du projet européen AVENUE (Autonomous Vehicles to Evolve to a New Urban Experience).

L’adaptation des infrastructures

A Lyon, les expérimentations des navettes autonomes sont conduites en relation étroite avec les équipes de la métropole. «Notre objectif est de nous approprier ces technologies nouvelles. En étant proactifs, nous pouvons aussi orienter le travail de recherche des constructeurs», explique Pierre Soulard, responsable du service de la mobilité urbaine à la métropole. Pour l’heure, pas question de généraliser l’implémentation de ces technologies dans les infrastructures, mais il faut être prêt pour équiper les artères de la métropole en vue de l’arrivée des navettes autonomes.

Transports et numérique : vers une mobilité

Associant les technologies de l’information et de la communication à l’ingénierie des transports, les systèmes de transport intelligents (ITS) se développent de plus en plus en France. Et pour cause, permettant d’améliorer la sécurité, le confort, la fiabilité des déplacements, ces derniers ont un rôle à jouer de premier plan dans la mobilité du futur.

Newspaper: Journal des Entreprises – Navya lance deux navettes autonomes pour la desserte du Parc OL

Source: Journal des Entreprises | Edition Rhônes-Alpes | 2019

L’entreprise villeurbannaise spécialisée dans les systèmes de conduite autonome Navya (CA 2018 : 19 M€ / 290 salariés) a lancé vendredi 15 novembre deux navettes autonomes intégrées au réseau de transports en commun lyonnais pour relier la station de tramway T3 Décines Grand Large au Parc OL. Baptisée N1, la ligne fonctionnera sur route ouverte en semaine de 8h30 à 19h30 et offre une nouvelle solution d’accès au Parc OL pour les salariés des entreprises installées sur le site. Ce service inscrit dans le cadre du dispositif européen «Avenue», qui vise le développement des véhicules autonomes dans les villes européennes.

NAVYA annonce le lancement d’un nouveau service de navettes autonomes entièrement intégré au réseau de transports en commun lyonnais

Article de Navya

Expérimentation sur route ouverte pour la desserte du Parc Olympique Lyonnais

Villeurbanne, France, le 18 novembre 2019 – 08h00 CET – Avec la mise en service vendredi dernier de deux navettes autonomes, NAVYA (FR0013018041- NAVYA), un leader des systèmes de conduite autonome, accompagne le développement technologique du réseau de transports en commun de la métropole lyonnaise.  

[…]

Ce service développé en collaboration avec le SYTRAL[1] et l’opérateur de transport Keolis, s’inscrit dans le cadre du dispositif européen AVENUE, «Autonomous Vehicles to Evolve to New Urban Experience», sélectionnée par le projet européen HORIZON 2020, pour le développement des véhicules autonomes dans les villes européennes. Les villes de Genève, Luxembourg et Copenhague ont aussi été retenues comme sites pilotes.

Lire l’article: https://navya.tech/press/navya-annonce-le-lancement-dun-nouveau-service-de-navettes-autonomes-entierement-integre-au-reseau-de-transports-en-commun-lyonnais/