The slow but steady progress of driverless buses in Switzerland

Source : Swissinfo
Simon Bradley – September 24, 2020

When the Belle-Idée project is fully up and running, three shuttle buses  will offer an on-demand door-to-door service at the Geneva hospital  site.
When the Belle-Idée project is fully up and running, three shuttle buses will offer an on-demand door-to-door service at the Geneva hospital site. swissinfo.ch

Over the past five years, various kinds of autonomous vehicles, including buses, have popped up on Swiss roads. But though testing continues, a driverless future might yet be some years away.

This article is also available in other languages :
deutch (de)
Shuttle-Bus ohne Fahrer ist noch Zukunftsmusik
Português (pt) Ônibus sem motorista na Suíça avança, mas com muitas paradas
中文 (zh) 瑞士无人驾驶公交车虽进展缓慢,却仍在稳步推进
عربي (ar) الحافلات ذاتية القيادة في سويسرا تتقدّم ببطء ولكن بثبات
Français (fr) Les bus autonomes font leur chemin en Suisse
Pусский (ru) Беспилотный транспорт Швейцарии развивается медленно, но верно
Italiano (it) Gli autobus autonomi si fanno strada pian piano in Svizzera

On a crisp autumn morning in the Geneva countryside, a bright orange-and-white electric bus is winding through the leafy 36-hectare grounds of the Belle-Idée hospital site.

The bus is trundling along a gravel path when suddenly a patient and a nurse step out from behind a tree. The vehicle brakes sharply, a bell rings out, a “keep your distance” sign flashes at the front and rear. The couple steps back, and the bus continues slowly on its way.

The toy-like shuttle – empty apart from a safety operator and guided by sensors, GPS and radar – is the centrepiece of a unique driverless public transport experiment.

“It’s a world first for a public transport service,” says Dimitri Konstantas, director of the Information Science Institute at the University of Geneva, who is coordinating the project. “Most sites and lines have a fixed route… but here the difference is that there is no route. You can go anywhere.”

Testing, testing

This summer, a small team began testing the ten-seater vehicles, mapping out the huge Belle-Idée park and its obstacles. In parallel, a Geneva-based start-up, MobileThinking, has been putting the finishing touches to an app that will be tried out by the first passengers before the end of the year.

Then when the project is up and running in the next couple of years, patients, visitors and staff will be able to get around the sprawling complex by using their smartphone to order one of three buses offering an on-demand door-to-door service. External Content

Sign up! Stay connected to Swiss science news and trends

Users will be able to locate a bus via the app, then send a pick-up request. Software from the Lausanne firm Bestmile will indicate when a bus is available and what the journey time will be. A fleet management system will then adapt the vehicle’s route according to other passenger requests.

The idea is to have a completely automated system with a safety operator back at a central depot monitoring the vehicles, says Jeroen Beukers, an autonomous vehicle expert who is running the project for the Geneva public transport authorities (TPG).

“Next week we are installing electric doors on the bus depot. In the future, you’ll make a booking on your phone, the depot doors will open automatically, a charged bus will pick you up from A and take you to B and then either return to the depot or continue onwards to pick up someone else,” he says.

Driverless bus in Geneva
One of the ten-seater driverless buses drives through the 36-hectare hospital site, east of Geneva city centre. swissinfo.ch

European project

The project is not Geneva’s first driverless bus trial: TPG has been successfully running an automated shuttle on a fixed circular route in Meyrin since 2018.

The Belle-Idée project was selected as part of a four-year European driverless vehicle initiative known as AVENUE (Autonomous Vehicles to Evolve to a New Urban Experience). The European consortium, funded by the European Union’s Horizon 2020 programme, includes pilot schemes in Lyon (France), Luxembourg and Copenhagen (Denmark).

Driverless vehicles in Switzerland

Over the past five years a growing number of other Swiss cities and transport companies have experimented with driverless vehicles on fixed routes (see infobox). This includes Sion, the capital of canton Valais, which in 2016 became the first Swiss city to launch an autonomous bus service in collaboration with Swiss Post.

Apart from the odd minor accident, the results of these trials have been generally positive, with thousands of passengers now regularly taking driverless shuttles.

Swiss ‘pioneer’

The trials have allowed Switzerland “to position itself as a pioneer” in this field, according to Marina Kaempf, spokesperson for the Federal Roads Office.

In most cases the tests were well accepted by the public, with municipalities and cantons developing “realistic” projects to show what the vehicles can do, she tells swissinfo.ch.

But current technologies still don’t allow vehicles that are 100% driverless – i.e. without a safety operator – to be used commercially, the Roads Office says. The exchange of data between driverless vehicles and the outside environment also needs to be improved.

“Longer term, you can imagine driverless buses running more permanently on certain lines when their technologies have been perfected,” says Kaempf. But in the short-term, while autonomous pilot schemes will continue in their current form, the Roads Office is not planning to increase them or turn them into commercial ventures.

Meanwhile, in parallel to these trials, the government is gearing up for the wider use of driverless vehicles on Swiss roads in the coming years. In August, it launched a consultation process to revise the Federal Law on Road Traffic. Part of the proposal aims to improve the legal basis for automated driving and future testing, and to ensure Switzerland can adapt to any international developments in this field.

Huge challenges ahead

Despite Switzerland pushing ahead, not all mobility experts are convinced by driverless buses.

“Maybe they’ll have made big progress in 20 years, but at the moment autonomous buses are a bit of a gadget,” says Vincent Kaufmann, a professor at the Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne (EPFL) and scientific director of the Mobile Lives Forum in Paris.

“What’s interesting is not so much driverless buses, but shared autonomous vehicles, like taxis. We’ll continue to need trams, trains and buses, where you carry 100-200 passengers. But if the shared autonomous vehicle can replace the individual car in the city that’ll be a real gain.”

Driverless challenges – both regulatory and technical – remain huge, raising many questions. Will the introduction of autonomous buses, taxis and privately-owned driverless vehicles just clog up the roads if they are not correctly regulated? How safe will such vehicles be? Will autonomous buses be used downtown or just in suburban areas? How will private data used by autonomous vehicles and passengers be protected? What legal responsibility will public transport firms and drivers have for their autonomous vehicles?

At the technical level, Konstantas feels driverless vehicles still have a long way to go before they can correctly identify objects and anticipate people’s behaviour in the streets.

“Tesla is working on it, but I doubt they’ll be able to do that within 15-20 years,” he says.

He also sees data protection as a big issue. “We’re not allowed to use the data of people walking around in order to learn from it,” he says. “Our system is programmed. It’s not dynamic learning or AI – we don’t have that yet.”

“What we’re doing here is experimental. Is it possible to build the future? We don’t know. Is this going to be useful or not? We don’t know. But we’re going to try.”

On a crisp autumn morning in the Geneva countryside, a bright orange-and-white electric bus is winding through the leafy 36-hectare grounds of the Belle-Idée hospital site.

The bus is trundling along a gravel path when suddenly a patient and a nurse step out from behind a tree. The vehicle brakes sharply, a bell rings out, a “keep your distance” sign flashes at the front and rear. The couple steps back, and the bus continues slowly on its way.

The toy-like shuttle – empty apart from a safety operator and guided by sensors, GPS and radar – is the centrepiece of a unique driverless public transport experiment.

“It’s a world first for a public transport service,” says Dimitri Konstantas, director of the Information Science Institute at the University of Geneva, who is coordinating the project. “Most sites and lines have a fixed route… but here the difference is that there is no route. You can go anywhere.”

Autonomous Vehicles to Evolve to a New Urban Experience

AVENUE aims to design and carry out full scale demonstrations of urban transport automation by deploying, for the first time worldwide, fleets of autonomous mini-buses in low to medium demand areas of 4 European demonstrator cities: Geneva, Lyon, Copenhagen and Luxembourg, and 3 replicator cities. 

To the Cordis Website

Radio Lac – Genève va tester cet été des navettes autonomes sur demande

Source: Radio Lac
18 juin 2020

Deux navettes autonomes assurant un service à la demande par le biais d’une application seront testées sur le site hospitalier de Belle-Idée fin juin à Genève. Les autorités fédérales ont donné le feu vert pour exploiter ce nouveau type de véhicule. C’est une première mondiale pour un service public.

Les Transports publics genevois (TPG) prévoient d’intégrer ces deux navettes électriques d’une capacité de quinze personnes dès la fin juin, indiquent-ils jeudi dans un communiqué. Elles fonctionneront dans un premier temps sur la moitié du parcours, à vide, afin de procéder aux ajustements nécessaires. A la fin août, les TPG devraient être en mesure d’engager les navettes sur l’ensemble du réseau routier existant au sein de Belle-Idée, sans imposer de trajets et d’arrêts fixes.

Un modèle à changer

Les utilisateurs peuvent voir sur l’application où se situent les véhicules. Ils envoient ensuite une demande de trajet. Le logiciel, qui repère l’utilisateur, indique quel véhicule est disponible et le délai pour l’obtenir. Le logiciel adapte ensuite le trajet en fonction des autres demandes. Ce projet représente une opportunité pour les Hôpitaux universitaires de Genève (HUG) d’expérimenter une

solution innovante de transport de proximité. Néanmoins, celui-ci implique de modifier le modèle de transport public que l’on connaît aujourd’hui. Le directeur de l’Information Science Institute de l’Université et de Genève (UNIGE) et coordinateur du projet, Dimitri Konstantas.

Dimitri Konstantas

Directeur de l’Information Science Institute de l’Université de Genève (UNIGE) et coordinateu…

Le service est destiné aux patients, visiteurs et collaborateurs des hôpitaux de psychiatrie et de gériatrie situés sur le site de Belle-Idée.

Projet européen

Les TPG exploitent déjà un véhicule automatisé sur une ligne à Meyrin depuis 2018. Le trajet est fixe, contrairement au nouveau service autonome prévu à Belle-idée. A noter que la législation suisse impose pour l’heure la présence d’un opérateur dans le véhicule.

Ce nouveau service à la demande pour un véhicule autonome a été développé dans le cadre du projet AVENUE (pour Automous Vehicles to Evolve to a New Urban Experience), un consortium européen soutenu par la Commission européenne. Doté de 20 millions d’euros sur quatre ans, ce projet regroupe seize partenaires européens, dont cinq en Suisse.

Parmi les contraintes qui ont dû être abordées par le consortium AVENUE, les 2 véhicules qui circuleront sur le site hospitalier, il faut donc que l’application puisse choisir quel véhicule est le meilleur à envoyer sur place, en tenant compte que ceux-ci peuvent déjà transporter des gens. Le coordinateur du projet, Dimitri Konstantas.

ATS – Des navettes autonomes sur demande testées à Genève

Source: Keystone ATS
18 juin 2020

Deux navettes autonomes assurant un service à la demande par le biais d’une application seront testées sur le site hospitalier de Belle-Idée à Genève. Les autorités fédérales ont donné le feu vert pour exploiter ce nouveau type de véhicule.

“C’est une première mondiale pour un service public”, indique le professeur Dimitri Konstantas, directeur de l’Information Science Institute de l’Université et de Genève (UNIGE) et coordinateur du projet. Les Transports publics genevois (TPG) prévoient d’intégrer ces deux navettes électriques d’une capacité de quinze personnes dès la fin juin, indiquent-ils jeudi dans un communiqué.

Elles fonctionneront dans un premier temps sur la moitié du parcours, à vide, afin de procéder aux ajustements nécessaires. A la fin août, les TPG devraient être en mesure d’engager les navettes sur l’ensemble du réseau routier existant au sein de Belle-Idée, sans imposer de trajets et d’arrêts fixes.

Adaptation

En effet, les utilisateurs peuvent voir sur l’application où se situent les véhicules. Ils envoient ensuite une demande de trajet. Le logiciel, qui repère l’utilisateur, indique quel véhicule est disponible et le délai pour l’obtenir. Le logiciel adapte ensuite le trajet en fonction des autres demandes, précise le professeur Konstantas.

Ce projet représente une opportunité pour les Hôpitaux universitaires de Genève (HUG) d’expérimenter une solution innovante de transport de proximité, précise le communiqué commun des HUG, TPG et de l’UNIGE. Le service est destiné aux patients, visiteurs et collaborateurs des hôpitaux de psychiatrie et de gériatrie situés sur le site de Belle-Idée.

Projet européen

Les TPG exploitent déjà un véhicule automatisé sur une ligne à Meyrin depuis 2018. Le trajet est fixe, contrairement au nouveau service autonome prévu à Belle-idée. A noter que la législation suisse impose pour l’heure la présence d’un opérateur dans le véhicule.

Ce nouveau service à la demande pour un véhicule autonome a été développé dans le cadre du projet AVENUE (pour Automous Vehicles to Evolve to a New Urban Experience), un consortium européen soutenu par la Commission européenne. Doté de 20 millions d’euros sur quatre ans, ce projet regroupe seize partenaires européens, dont cinq en Suisse.

20 Minutes – Bus sans chauffeur et à la demande, via une application

Source: 20 minutes
18 juin 2020

Les TPG exploiteront des navettes autonomes sur le site hospitalier de Belle-Idée. Les usagers pourront faire appel à ce transport en utilisant leur smartphone. Les tests débuteront à la fin du mois.

Un véhicule sans conducteur fera bientôt du porte à porte sur le site de l’hôpital psychiatrique de Belle-Idée, à Thônex (GE). Particularité: le transport se fera à la demande, en utilisant une application dédiée. Ce système est une première mondiale pour un service public, selon les TPG, les HUG et l’Université de Genève, qui collaborent sur ce projet. Aujourd’hui, des bus automatisés sont déjà en service à Meyrin (GE), Marly (FR) ou encore à Sion (VS). «Mais il s’agit de lignes avec des horaires et des parcours fixes, précise François Mutter, porte-parole des Transports

publics genevois. Là, ce sera un service personnalisé, en quelque sorte, qui utilisera la géolocalisation.»

La navette sans chauffeur, qui peut accueillir 15 personnes – des patients ou des visiteurs – effectuera des trajets de quelques centaines de mètres seulement, sur le site de Belle-Idée. Par mesure de sécurité, un opérateur TPG sera toujours à bord pour pallier au moindre problème. Les tests débuteront à la fin du mois. L’exploitation à proprement parler est prévue dès la fin août prochain.

Projet à l’échelle européenne

Le lancement de ce nouveau projet de transports publics sans chauffeur a reçu le feu vert de la Confédération. Il fait également partie du programme du consortium européen AVENUE (Autonomous Vehicles to Evolve to a New Urban Experience), piloté par l’Université de Genève.

Son budget de 20 millions d’euros est principalement couvert par la Commission européenne. Il compte seize partenaires en tout, dont cinq suisses. Parmi eux, des entités genevoises mais aussi une start-up fondée par l’Ecole polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL).

Le Courrier – Navettes autonomes

Source: Le Courrier
19 juin 2020

Deux navettes autonomes assurant un service à la demande par le biais d’une application seront testées sur le site hospitalier de Belle-Idée à Genève. Les autorités fédérales ont donné le feu vert pour exploiter ce nouveau type de véhicule. Les TPG exploitent déjà un véhicule automatisé sur une ligne à Meyrin depuis 2018.

ATS

UN TAD AUTONOME TESTÉ À GENÈVE

Source: Bus&Car Connexion

Nouvelle génération de transport à la demande. Les Transports publics genevois (TPG) vont expérimenter un TAD autonome sur un site hospitalier situé dans le canton de Genève. La régie a reçu, le 3 juin dernier, une autorisation officielle du département fédéral de l’Environnement, des Transports, de l’Énergie et de la Communication (Detec) pour exploiter des navettes autonomes, dans le cadre du projet européen AVENUE (Autonomous Vehicles to Evolve to New Urban Experience). Ce projet a pour objectif de préparer l’intégration technique, législative et économique des véhicules autonomes dans l’espace urbain et péri-urbain. Les TPG déploieront cette expérimentation pour une durée de trois ans sur le site du domaine de Belle-Idée, à Thônex, en partenariat avec les Hôpitaux universitaires de Genève (HUG). L’objectif est de développer une nouvelle génération de transport à la demande, que l’on sollicite par l’intermédiaire d’une application et qui transporte le client de porte à porte (transport publique autonome partagé). Il s’agit d’une opportunité pour les HUG d’expérimenter une solution innovante de transport de proximité à destination des patients et visiteurs et personnels de l’Hôpital des Trois-Chênes.

Déploiement progressif. Les TPG bénéficient d’ores et déjà d’une expérience dans le domaine des navettes autonomes avec l’exploitation en véhicule automatisé de la ligne XA à Meyrin depuis 2018. Ce sont d’ailleurs deux véhicules Navya Autonom Shuttle, identiques à celui qui circule aujourd’hui à Meyrin, qui seront mis en service sur le site de Belle-Idée. Ces véhicules électriques automatisés, d’une capacité de 15 passagers, devraient être intégrés dès la fin du mois de juin sur la moitié du parcours prévu, afin de réaliser des essais (marches à blanc) et de procéder aux ajustements nécessaires. Les TPG prévoient d’être en mesure d’engager les navettes sur l’ensemble du réseau routier du site de Belle-Idée dès la fin du mois d’août prochain, et ce sans imposer de trajets ni d’arrêts fixes, ce qui permettra de réaliser un essai grandeur nature de ce nouveau type de service à la demande.

I. F.

La Liberté – Des navettes autonomes sur demande testées à Genève

Source: La Liberté
18 juin 2020

Deux navettes autonomes assurant un service à la demande par le biais d’une application seront testées sur le site hospitalier de Belle-Idée à Genève. Les autorités fédérales ont donné le feu vert pour exploiter ce nouveau type de véhicule.

“C’est une première mondiale pour un service public”, indique le professeur Dimitri Konstantas, directeur de l’Information Science Institute de l’Université et de Genève (UNIGE) et coordinateur du projet. Les Transports publics genevois (TPG) prévoient d’intégrer ces deux navettes électriques d’une capacité de quinze personnes dès la fin juin, indiquent-ils jeudi dans un communiqué.

Elles fonctionneront dans un premier temps sur la moitié du parcours, à vide, afin de procéder aux ajustements nécessaires. A la fin août, les TPG devraient être en mesure d’engager les navettes sur l’ensemble du réseau routier existant au sein de Belle-Idée, sans imposer de trajets et d’arrêts fixes.

Adaptation

En effet, les utilisateurs peuvent voir sur l’application où se situent les véhicules. Ils envoient ensuite une demande de trajet. Le logiciel, qui repère l’utilisateur, indique quel véhicule est disponible et le délai pour l’obtenir. Le logiciel adapte ensuite le trajet en fonction des autres demandes, précise le professeur Konstantas.

Ce projet représente une opportunité pour les Hôpitaux universitaires de Genève (HUG) d’expérimenter une solution innovante de transport de proximité, précise le communiqué commun des HUG, TPG et de l’UNIGE. Le service est destiné aux patients, visiteurs et collaborateurs des hôpitaux de psychiatrie et de gériatrie situés sur le site de Belle-Idée.

Projet européen

Les TPG exploitent déjà un véhicule automatisé sur une ligne à Meyrin depuis 2018. Le trajet est fixe, contrairement au nouveau service autonome prévu à Belle-idée. A noter que la législation suisse impose pour l’heure la présence d’un opérateur dans le véhicule.

Ce nouveau service à la demande pour un véhicule autonome a été développé dans le cadre du projet AVENUE (pour Automous Vehicles to Evolve to a New Urban Experience), un consortium européen soutenu par la Commission européenne. Doté de 20 millions d’euros sur quatre ans, ce projet regroupe seize partenaires européens, dont cinq en Suisse.

ATS

De nouvelles navettes autonomes déployées fin juin à Genève

Source: Heidi.News
18 juin 2020

Et s’il était aussi facile de héler un bus autonome qu’un taxi? C’est l’idée derrière les navettes autonomes en cours de déploiement à Genève sur le site de l’hôpital de Belle-Idée, en partenariat avec les Hôpitaux universitaires de Genève (HUG). Deux véhicules commenceront à circuler en test à partir de fin juin 2020 sur le réseau routier du site. Des passagers pourront les emprunter dès le mois d’août.

Pourquoi c’est novateur. Contrairement à la ligne opérée depuis mars 2018 à Meyrin par les TPG sur la ligne XA, la navette ne s’arrêtera pas à des arrêts prédéterminés, mais à la demande, grâce à une application. Une première mondiale pour un site public, explique le coordinateur du projet. Mené par le consortium européen Avenue et piloté par l’Université de Genève aux côtés de la ville et du canton, il pourrait faire des émules en Europe.

Swissinfo – Des navettes autonomes sur demande testées à Genève

Source: Swissinfo
18 juin 2020

Deux navettes autonomes assurant un service à la demande par le biais d’une application seront testées sur le site hospitalier de Belle-Idée à Genève. Les autorités fédérales ont donné le feu vert pour exploiter ce nouveau type de véhicule.

“C’est une première mondiale pour un service public”, indique le professeur Dimitri Konstantas, directeur de l’Information Science Institute de l’Université et de Genève (UNIGE) et coordinateur du projet. Les Transports publics genevois (TPG) prévoient d’intégrer ces deux navettes électriques d’une capacité de quinze personnes dès la fin juin, indiquent-ils jeudi dans un communiqué.

Elles fonctionneront dans un premier temps sur la moitié du parcours, à vide, afin de procéder aux ajustements nécessaires. A la fin août, les TPG devraient être en mesure d’engager les navettes sur l’ensemble du réseau routier existant au sein de Belle-Idée, sans imposer de trajets et d’arrêts fixes.

Adaptation

En effet, les utilisateurs peuvent voir sur l’application où se situent les véhicules. Ils envoient ensuite une demande de trajet. Le logiciel, qui repère l’utilisateur, indique quel véhicule est disponible et le délai pour l’obtenir. Le logiciel adapte ensuite le trajet en fonction des autres demandes, précise le professeur Konstantas.

Ce projet représente une opportunité pour les Hôpitaux universitaires de Genève (HUG) d’expérimenter une solution innovante de transport de proximité, précise le communiqué commun des HUG, TPG et de l’UNIGE. Le service est destiné aux patients, visiteurs et collaborateurs des hôpitaux de psychiatrie et de gériatrie situés sur le site de Belle-Idée.

Projet européen

Les TPG exploitent déjà un véhicule automatisé sur une ligne à Meyrin depuis 2018. Le trajet est fixe, contrairement au nouveau service autonome prévu à Belle-idée. A noter que la législation suisse impose pour l’heure la présence d’un opérateur dans le véhicule.

Ce nouveau service à la demande pour un véhicule autonome a été développé dans le cadre du projet AVENUE (pour Automous Vehicles to Evolve to a New Urban Experience), un consortium européen soutenu par la Commission européenne. Doté de 20 millions d’euros sur quatre ans, ce projet regroupe seize partenaires européens, dont cinq en Suisse.